New Story: ‘The Official Edgar Wright Art Show’ for L.A. Weekly

Edgar Wright with artist Joey Spiotto (Photo: Liz Ohanesian for L.A. Weekly)

Edgar Wright with artist Joey Spiotto (Photo: Liz Ohanesian for L.A. Weekly)

I write a weekly column for L.A. Weekly’s arts blog, Public Spectacle. The column is called “Cult Stars” and, in it, I try to cover different aspects of the art and entertainment worlds. You could probably call it a “geek” column of sorts, although I don’t.

In the most recent installment of said column, I went to “The Official Edgar Wright Art Show” at Gallery 1988. Nearly 100 artists paid tribute to Wright’s work, from Spaced to The World’s End. The latter comes out on Friday. It was an interesting show, as well as a popular one. People got in line early for a chance to get inside and purchase one of the limited edition prints. Also, Wright attended the event with frequent collaborators Simon Pegg and Nick Frost.

Read all about it in the latest installment of “Cult Stars.” 

(cross-posted with lizohanesian.com.)

 

I Played Club Microwave at California Institution of Abnormal Arts

The stage at CIA.

The stage at CIA.

There’s a venue in North Hollywood called the California Institution of Abnormal Arts (CIA). It’s on one of those big, Valley boulevards that practically beg for you to speed along without a second glance. But this spot, set back only a bit from the street, is marked by a clown on the gate and a clown on the front door. They aren’t as eye-catching as the big, polka-dot guy atop Circus Liquor a few blocks east, but you will notice them. I have plenty of times before Saturday night, but for some odd reason or other, never stopped to peek inside. I’ve actually had friends, a lot of them, play here and yet, it wasn’t until two nights ago that I made the trip here.

Clearly, I have been missing out on something special. CIA is the coolest venue I’ve seen in the Valley. It appears small, even after you walk inside. The actual performance area is roughly comparable in size to an itty-bitty punk club. It’s a little rough around the edges too. Look closely and you’ll find tiny cracks in the patterns on the floor of the stage. The scruffiness goes with the decor, which is a mix of oddball vintage finds. There are old mannequins done up in bizarre fashion, skills, dolls heads and lots of candles. The more you explore, the more bizarre this space is.
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